One Box of Great Merchandise


Oh finally!  I got one whole box of items put into my inventory.  Of course, this box was on the floor so my desk doesn’t look any less full but in my mind I’m relieved.  This is the story of the “Moist and Meaty” box:

The Cow Creamer (who could resist a cow?) that has missing tips on both ears and a chip on one hoof and paint loss (which I saw selling on the internet for $180.00 in pristine condition).  They said that it was made in Germany.  It does look as if it was and feel as if it was but it isn’t marked which may mean it was made prior to 1898; and the Toothbrush Holder with the blue birds, holes that drain to the bottom and then drain out from there (a lot of discoloration and I was afraid to try to separate the top from the bottom because I didn’t know if it should have).  I love the stand-up toothbrush holders because you don’t see them much anymore.  Again no maker name on it.  Both were on http://www.facebook.com. in the WCNY.Shop:Antiques page.  Since this was Wayne County I knew I could go and pick it up and save postage.  They have more than antiques!  Another item I purchased there was the Geisha plate that you see in the picture which was quite heavy for that type of plate and had an embossed “S in a circle” that I could hardly see.  I never did identify that mark.  The last was a figurine.  It wasn’t until I picked it up to look closer that I realized it was a figurine of a woman on a chamber pot with her bare butt showing.  When I looked this up (again unmarked) I found that these are called “naughty items” and also sell from $25 to $180.  Naughty or not, someone had good? taste!  She is in excellent shape also and will make a wonderful conversation piece for guests when you put it in your parlor.  The article that I read did not have this particular figurine but mentioned again that they were mostly made in Germany in the late 1800’s.

The Seller and I made arrangements for me to drive over.  After I received the directions I realized that my paranormal forces were working again because in six years since I’ve been back in Wolcott, I haven’t been in that area but within the last month I picked up things there.  Half of this job that that I love is meeting the people.  The woman who was selling them was wonderful.  She and I talked forever.  She even was selling peacock feathers from her peacocks and had a really mellow Corgi and a Rottie that she didn’t introduce me to.  I wasn’t sure if there was a reason for that so I didn’t ask.  She also had some cats so we were kindred spirits.  After she packed the two items she pointed to a box and said that she had just gotten them when a close relative passed.  I asked her if maybe she would consider selling any of them and so she started pulling them out of the box.

So, aside from what I have mentioned above, add to the pile what I call a “poyye chic” item because I can’t use the real chic name unless I ask Rachel Ashwell.  The platter has a hairline but again, it’s getting hard to locate pink and white antiques because so many people are decorating with “poyye chic items along with me.

Next up (or out) was a flow blue cup.  Sold!  I decorate my living room with flow blue (and here we go again with keeping stuff instead of selling it.  The only difference is that I’ve decided that each time I add something to the house I have to put one of my other house things into the shop).  I looked for at least 6 hours and couldn’t find the pattern.  It looked so familiar!  I just marked it Flow Blue Oriental and took it into the livingroom to set in front of a plate which (paranormal) wouldn’t you know it…..Was the same pattern and had the company name “oriental England” on the back with a mark of a loving cup and a beehive.  There is a chip in it but it matched that plate that my mother-in-law gave me so I was pretty pleased. I was so sick of looking at flow blue that I decided I would look up the mark later.

Next out of the box was a salad sized plate that was labeled “Fred Bevier, Funeral Director & Furniture Dealer, Wolcott, N.Y.” in very faded gold and was a monthly calendar for the year of 1913.  Has anyone noticed how many funeral directors were furniture dealers?  I do hope that they didn’t use coffins for furniture!  Aside from the fading there are no chips but it is heavily crazed (as am I).

And, then a blue and white cup and saucer which one web site had said was the “chintz” type and were made by Buffalo Pottery.  Of course there were no marks on this one but I did find one called “Marigold”.  Since this one has thorns on the stems of the flowers I just assumed that it was Hawthorn or Wild Rose.  I never did find it.  This one is really beautiful but has discoloration and two (I think) chips.  Next was a set of matching Geishaware Saucers with one cup.  This was pretty unusual for the fact that I have so many unmatching Geishaware items that I was somewhat surprised to find matching scenes in good condition.

And last out of the box was a Geishaware saucer in a different pattern.  I haven’t yet gone out to the shop to see if it matches any of mine.  It was in perfect condition though with an old milk glass basket with two handles holding a nest with an egg in it and then a chick with its head out of the egg.  This was identified by another website to be a 1900 Westmoreland piece but again, there is no mark.

So, this is what I have been doing since 8:00 am and it is now 3:20 pm and my daughter and her husband are due for dinner here at 4 pm!  I’m so glad that my husband does the cooking.  Any of the items in the pictures and above can be seen and purchased at Aussie-Magic Vintiques, 6150 Powers Road, Wolcott (315)594-1905.

Noodles!

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